Testing Ping Times from an Outside Source

My blogless friend Zach shared this great tip with me: if you would like to test ping times to a machine from an outside source, telnet to route-server.ip.att.net. There, you will be presented with a command line which allows you to ping from the AT&T servers.

############## route-server.ip.att.net ###############
######### AT&T IP Services Route Monitor ###########
The information available through route-server.ip.att.net is offered
by AT&T’s Internet engineering organization to the Internet community.
This router has the global routing table view from each of the above
routers, providing a glimpse to the Internet routing table from the
AT&T network’s perspective.

This router maintains eBGP peerings with customer-facing routers
throughout the AT&T IP Services Backbone:
12.123.21.243 Atlanta, GA 12.123.133.124 Austin, TX
12.123.41.250 Cambridge, MA 12.123.5.240 Chicago,IL
12.123.17.244 Dallas, TX 12.123.139.124 Detroit, MI
12.123.37.250 Denver, CO 12.123.134.124 Houston, TX
12.123.29.249 Los Angeles, CA 12.123.1.236 New York, NY
12.123.33.249 Orlando,FL 12.123.137.124 Philadelphia, PA
12.123.142.124 Phoenix, AZ 12.123.145.124 San Diego, CA
12.123.13.241 San Francisco, CA 12.123.25.245 St. Louis, MO
12.123.45.252 Seattle, WA 12.123.9.241 Washington, DC

*** Please Note:
Ping and traceroute delay figures measured with this box are unreliable,
due to the high CPU load this box experiences when complicated “show” commands
are being executed.

For questions about this route-server, send email to: [email protected]

#################### route-server.ip.att.net ####################

route-server>ping netnerds.net
Translating “netnerds.net”…domain server (12.127.17.83) [OK]

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 69.90.210.117, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 64/66/68 ms

In testing this, I also learned that telnet has been removed from Vista. Now really, Microsoft! Do your helpdesk people really never use telnet to troubleshoot network issues? I used it just yesterday to see if a Citrix server’s port was open. What a load of poo. At least I learned another cool trick when researching the removal. Shamit Patel’s blog suggested running start /w pkgmgr /iu:”TelnetClient” to install the client from the command line. Worked like a charm.. now to explore other options available with start /w pkgmgr.

Chrissy is a PowerShell MVP who has worked in IT for nearly 20 years, and currently serves as a Sr. Database Engineer in Belgium. Always an avid scripter, she attended the Monad session at Microsoft’s Professional Developers Conference in Los Angeles back in 2005 and has worked and played with PowerShell ever since. Chrissy is currently pursuing an MS in Systems Engineering at Regis University and helps maintain RealCajunRecipes.com in her spare time. She holds a number of certifications, including those relating to SQL Server, SuSE Linux, SharePoint and network security. She recently became co-lead of the SQL PASS PowerShell Virtual Chapter. You can follow her on Twitter at @cl.

Posted in Networking
7 comments on “Testing Ping Times from an Outside Source
  1. Zed A. Shaw says:

    Holy crap I knew there was a reason I put your blog in my rss reader. That’s about the most useful thing I’ve seen in a while. Thanks a bunch.

    Now to just write an API for it. :-)

  2. Corey says:

    Telnet is installed for me in Vista Ultimate. This was an upgrade from XP Pro, maybe that’s why.

    I think I’m in favor of “reducing the attack surface”, my parents don’t need telnet.

    Besides I use portqry for 90% of the things I used to use telnet for.

  3. Chrissy says:

    Zed,
    Haha I’d love to see an API for it.

    Corey,
    Yeah, this is a fresh install of Vista Ultimate and it didn’t have telnet. As someone said on Shamit’s blog (and I agree)

    I don’t like this idea. Telnet is often used as a quick way to troubleshoot client-side connectivity issues (ensure ports are open and so on). Telnet is 75K, so I hardly think the reduction in footprint is meaningful to anyone with a machine capable of running Vista. As far as surface area… if there’s no telnet:// URI prefix registered, I’d think that’d cut down significantly (who uses telnet URIs anyways?).

    I just tried portqry but it’s not something that’s built-in :| I like built in stuff.. some things should just be reliable. Like ping and telnet.

    Portqry looks interesting.. it has a GUI too. Thanks for the tip :)

  4. derwood says:

    Hola Chrissy,
    Just an FYI, you can also ping from an external source from http://www.dnsstuff.com. They also have a traceroute tool. Its quite a useful site.

  5. Elmo M. says:

    By default, Telnet is not installed on Vista. However follow these steps and you’re back in business.

    1. Click Start then select Control Panel.

    2. Select Programs and Features.

    3. Select Turn Windows features on or off.

    4. Select the Telnet Client option.

    5. Click OK.

    6. A dialog box will appear to confirm installation. The telnet command should now be available.

  6. Jonathan McLaren says:

    ….Linux? :D

  7. ...Corey? says:

    Corey:

    Reduce the attack surface?

    We’re talking about telnet client, not telnetd…

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