Can We Get These 3 SQLPS Issues Fixed before SQL Server 2016 RTMs?

YES WE CAN! Microsoft responded and fixed these 3 major issues in SQL Server Management Studio March 2016 Refresh. Read more at “WE DID IT! Microsoft Fixed Those 3 SQLPS Issues in SQL Server 2016“.


I’ll be honest, I don’t use the SQLPS module even though I’m the perfect candidate. I’ve been a SQL Server DBA since 1999 and a PowerSheller since 2005. A large majority of my PowerShell work is done within SQL Server, and still, I’d rather look up the syntax to load SMO assemblies, than to Import-Module SQLPS, and I’m not the only one.

Reasons I don’t use SQLPS
  1. It takes 3-5 seconds to load
  2. It changes my directory
  3. It produces warnings upon load

I feel displaced when I load the SQLPS module. Why does it take so long? Why you gotta yell all these warnings at me? Wait, where am I? SQLPS’s behavior seems to mimic that of the sqlps.exe minishell when it should really just be itself.

Please upvote these items on Microsoft Connect

SQLPS has a lot of of bugs that need to be addressed (I’ll get to that soon), but I propose we start with these three.

  1. SQLPS module is slow to load
  2. Loading SQLPS module changes current directory to PS SQLSERVER:\>
  3. SQLPS module uses unapproved PowerShell verbs

Each item even has suggested fixes. The fixes are pretty straightforward (said the DBA who doesn’t do QA). Bugs 1 and 2 suggest modifying a few lines in SqlPsPostScript.ps1, while number 3 probably requires a recompile and we’re not really sure how challenging that will be.

If you’re thinking that Microsoft won’t approve the the disapproved verbs request because of backwards compatibility issues, no fear, the Connect item suggests using Set-Alias to address this concern.

Why now? We’ve been waiting for years.

Recently, I teamed up with Aaron Nelson, a SQL Server MVP and Lead of SQL PASS PowerShell Virtual Chapter. Aaron is a SQL Server DBA, a huge proponent of PowerShell and he is also not a user of SQLPS in its current state. But he wants to be. I do, too. You probably do too if you aren’t already.

Aaron helped get this ball rolling the other night when we were working on some SQL PASS abstracts. He was writing up a session proposal about SQLPS, and I decided to take a stab at figuring out why SQLPS loaded so slowly.

Ultimately, commenting out two lines and adding one changed the load time from 5.1 seconds to 0.345 seconds. JUST LOOK AT THE POSSIBLITIES:

loadsqlps

This doesn’t have to be a (partial) pipe dream

The fact that the change was so simple yet so significant gave us hope. Maybe beginning to fix the SQLPS module doesn’t have to be this big thing.

We all want to want to use SQLPS

SQLPS has sordid past and sometimes just talking about it seems kind of controversial. Some folks vigorously defend it. Some denounce it. Ultimately, though, we all just want it to work.

fixthree

(for now)

We want a module that imports quickly, with no warnings and no change of directory. And while we all would love a well-developed module like those bestowed upon Lync, Exchange and SharePoint, I know we’ll all accept, for now, for this RTM, a module that works well right out the box.

Share

Time is running out, so let’s rally right now for a better SQLPS in SQL Server 2016 RTM. Please share this post, a post of your own, or the Connect items themselves.

Can We Get These 3 SQLPS Issues Fixed before SQL Server 2016 RTMs?
Connect: SQLPS module is slow to load
Connect: SQLPS module uses unapproved PowerShell verbs
Connect: SQLPS module changes current directory


Going Forward

As for future bug fixes, I’m going to create a repository somewhere, perhaps this blog, perhaps somewhere more official, that will hopefully bring visibility to all SQLPS bugs that have been submitted. I’ll do what I can to keep the momentum going. Perhaps I’ll even throw out a Twitter bot that searches for SQLPS bugs and posts them for easy retweeting.

Either way, keep an eye out on my Twitter or this blog for more info.

Chrissy is a PowerShell MVP who has worked in IT for nearly 20 years, and currently serves as a Sr. Database Engineer in Belgium. Always an avid scripter, she attended the Monad session at Microsoft’s Professional Developers Conference in Los Angeles back in 2005 and has worked and played with PowerShell ever since. Chrissy is currently pursuing an MS in Systems Engineering at Regis University and helps maintain RealCajunRecipes.com in her spare time. She holds a number of certifications, including those relating to SQL Server, SuSE Linux, SharePoint and network security. She recently became co-lead of the SQL PASS PowerShell Virtual Chapter. You can follow her on Twitter at @cl.

Posted in PowerShell, SQL Server
8 comments on “Can We Get These 3 SQLPS Issues Fixed before SQL Server 2016 RTMs?
  1. Jason Squires says:

    Totally agree!

  2. jeff_yao says:

    I strongly support the fix of “SQLPS module changes current directory”, and have no specific preference “SQLPS module is slow to load” (I really do not care much whether it takes 3 seconds or 0.3 seconds, but of course, if it can be quicker, it is better).
    I do have different opinion for “SQLPS module uses unapproved PowerShell verbs”. As DBA and frequent PS developer (since 2006), I’d say the so-called “PowerShell approved verbs” should be considered/treated *only* as a suggestion list. With PS being used in more areas (SQL server is one example), restricting ourselves to the “approved” verb is not only impractical but also weird in many scenarios. Say if I want “shut” down my computer or “scan” my environment, do I have to accommodate the “approved list” or should I cater to business logic?
    Actually the “approved verb” list itself keeps on changing, so do not confine ourselves to the list but use business logic as a guideline.

    • Chrissy LeMaire says:

      I don’t feel passionately about Approved Verbs, but I can see why they did it. It manages expectations of users, and keeps things consistent.

      When I started writing my SQL migration script, I used Migrate-SqlServer. But in fact, it’s really a Copy or Move, and I’ve since adjusted. You could have chosen Transfer for your migration script, and now suddenly, there’s no predictability.

      • Mark g says:

        I agree and use the Smo library after learning ps past a basic level
        What is interesting is that invoke-sqlcmd gave me the most problem
        Maybe you could explain why the method is so bad for error checking and robustness
        In the end wmi/smo/cim is brilliant if a little complex if you are not a .net programmer but this is currently best practice
        Sqlps would allow a lot more dba programmers to produce something productive

  3. Ken Van Hyning [MSFT] says:

    These have been fixed now in the March 2016 Refresh of SSMS. Please keep the connect bugs and suggestions coming. We are working on making more improvements to SQLPS in the months ahead.

    • Chrissy LeMaire says:

      SO IMPRESSIVE! Thank you, Ken. I’ll be letting everyone know that you guys are looking for Suggestions/Bugs to be filed on Connect!

1 Pings/Trackbacks for "Can We Get These 3 SQLPS Issues Fixed before SQL Server 2016 RTMs?"
  1. […] plenty of PoSh experts I know like the SQLPS module, but they want it improved. Apart from asking for a few changes in SQL Server 2016, there is a Connect item to open source the module. It’s an interesting idea, and certainly […]

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